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real business. >>> all right. first up, as airport delays mount to the faa is blaming the spending cuts sequester, forcing thousands of air traffic controllers to take unpaid leave. but republicans blame the obama administration for selectively choosing which cuts would make us all feel the most pain. take a listen to kansas senator jerry moran earlier today. >> it seems as if politics is playing a significant role in the determining what actions the faa are taking, and every indication that i have from conversations with my colleagues is it emanates from the white house. >> all right. here to talk about what i call the phony crisis and the obama democrats' attempt to raise $1.2 trillion in taxes is texas republican congressman, vice chair of the joint economic committee, my friend brady. and democratic strategist steve mcmann and townhall.com's guy benson here with me. mr. kevin brady, welcome. i know you blasted the irs for their fur lows. but i want to just put up -- i don't know if you can see this, probably not. i'm going to read the numbers. we're going to show you that the faa ha
penalty. >>> passengers experienced some delays at u.s. airports on monday as the faa began imposing furloughs of air traffic controls. but the widespread traffic never really materialized. flight aware.com says only about 150 flights were canceled. and is while some people waited nearly two hours to take off, delays were much shorter on average. let's get more now from aviation industry consultant ray. ray, good to see you. this isn't just a story about monday, is it? the real question is what happens as these furloughs continue to play out? >> yes. it's going to take at least a couple of days before we see the full impact of these budget cuts. >> talk a little bit about what's coming down the pike. it's pretty significant, to some extent. >> it is. and i think this puts forward a good argument on why the faa should be a public corporation in the u.s. with its own budget to get away from some of the politics of washington. this is a mandatory type of function that the airlines do need and is it's going to be very costly to the airlines, i believe, if this situation continues to move
, and what we think is the right solution is the faa, the government agency, they need to learn with those bodies. they need to learn to understand exactly what's being done in the different industries to deal with different threats. and that's how we're going to develop our own best practice. >> host: gautham nagesh. >> greg, you mentioned that thebacking industry is largely ahead of the curve when it comes to these sorts of things, likely due to the nature of the business itself, and like you said, the criminals are often looking for money. how would you say the broader employees of your industry, how successful would your education efforts be, would you say, and have there been any keys that could be applied to other critical infrastructure sectors? >> guest: i think the, you know, by and large, employees within the financial institutions, um, are fairly well aware of what's going on, and, you know, given over the last year increasing news about attacks on the financial system, the awareness has only grown. as part of every bank's standard procedures, employees are tested. they're train
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3